How Best to move your images from lightroom to photoshop to edit

In this episode, we’ll be looking at how best to move your images from Adobe Photoshop Lightroom to Adobe Photoshop for editing. This question came up from one of our members on the ForteSpy Online Community for creative professionals so we decided to do a detailed post on it.

 

Image Opened in Lightroom

Image Opened in Adobe Lightroom Classic 2018

 

Setting Up Adobe Photoshop Lightroom

First off, we import our RAW files into our preferred RAW processing software, which in this case is the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic 2018. After performing our preliminary tonal adjustments/edits in Lightroom, we are now set to take the files into Adobe Photoshop for editing. Before we do that, we need to set up/instruct Lightroom to seamlessly communicate with Photoshop. On the PC (Windows) platform, we’ll go to Edit > Preferences; On the Mac, we’ll go to Lightroom > Preferences and click. We’re greeted with a dialog box which pops up showing us various settings. Our concern now should be the External Editing Tab. Select that tab and it shows a list of parameters we need to pre-define. These parameters are then applied to our images as they leave Lightroom to Photoshop or any other external editor of our choice. In this case, Our external editor would be the Adobe Photoshop CC 2018.

External Editor Options

  1. File Format: You have either PSD or TIFF to select from depending on your workflow.
  2. Color Space: You have ProPhotoRGB, AdobeRGB (1998), Display P3 and sRGB.
    • ProPhoto RGB has the largest colour space and would be advisable to use this if your RAW image has this colour space.
    • AdobeRGB (1998) is a commonly used colour space especially for images destined for print.
    • Display P3 is a newly introduced colour space which is very close to the AdobeRGB (1998).
    • sRGB is also a commonly used colour space especially for images destined for screens or web purposes (online usage).
    • N.B Kindly ensure consistency with your chosen in-camera colour space.
  3. Bit Depth: You have either 8 bits/components or 16-bits/components to choose from depending on your workflow. 8bit files are usually smaller and more compatible with various programs and plugins, but will not preserve fine tonal detail and dynamic range as well as the 16bit data.
  4. Resolution: The default value is 240 but I usually keep mine at 300. You can set yours to your preferred value.
  5. Compression: With PSD files, there is no compression option; with TIFF files at 8bit, you have three compression options; None, LZW and ZIP while with TIFF files at 16bit you have two compression options. None and ZIP. If you decide not to choose any compression option, that would be fine but if you decide to choose a compression option, you’re okay with either of the options. They do basically the same thing, which is to reduce the size of the image without removing detail or colour information.
  6. Stack With Original: This option would enable you to stack the edited version from Photoshop next to the Original version when viewed in Lightroom afterwards.
  7. Edit Externally File Naming: In this column, you can specify a preferred naming nomenclature to be applied after an image leaves Lightroom to an external editor of your choice so that when it returns to Lightroom, it can easily be distinguished from the original image.

When you’re done setting up Lightroom, click OK.

Setting Up Adobe Photoshop CC

Launch Adobe Photoshop and go to Edit  > Color Settings on the PC; same on the Mac. Most of the parameters are okay at default settings. Make sure you have the following boxes clicked. Profile Mismatches and Missing profiles (3 boxes). Click Okay

color settings

colour settings

Importing To Photoshop

At this point, we can now go back to our Lightroom application which is already open. Go to the Develop Module and select the image(s) you want to edit in photoshop; Right-click >Edit > Edit in Adobe Photoshop 2018 and the RAW file moves over seamlessly to Photoshop with all the edits applied to it in Lightroom for you to continue editing. After editing in Photoshop, you go to File > Save, and then open Lightroom, You’ll see the edited copy of the image stacked next to the original image with the pre-defined file naming you set up initially. If you want the images to appear individually in Lightroom you can go to the Library Module and select Photo > Stacking > Unstack. This separates them and they are now two individual images.

Tip

  • If there are two or more photos you wish to composite in Photoshop, right-click and select “Edit in” and “Open as Layers in Photoshop.” The images open as one layered file in Photoshop.
  • If you are exporting a TIFF, PSD or JPEG file. Right-Click on the image and a dialog box will pop up with three options as follows; Choose from “Edit a Copy with Lightroom Adjustments,” “Edit a Copy” or “Edit Original” and the image would open in Photoshop.
  • DNG or camera raw files open directly in Photoshop.
  • If you have a conflict of colour spaces between Lightroom and Photoshop you’ll get a notification prompting you to either go ahead with the embedded colour space that is coming from Lightroom, or you change it to the assigned colour space in Photoshop or you ignore colour management entirely.
color profile

colour settings

Conclusion

With these simple steps, it’s that easy to take your images from Lightroom to Photoshop and back to Lightroom. You can go ahead and practice this tip so you get a grip of it. Just in case you have a similar or totally different method of achieving the same results you can do well to share your thoughts in the comments section below.

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Forte

Forte

Digital Content Creator at ForteSpy Productions
Nigerian Wedding, Beauty, Portraits And Fashion Photographer | Cinematographer | 3D Animator | Motion Graphic Artist | Graphic And Web Designer
Forte
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